Industry News

Audacy Releases Company Social Impact Report

Audacy shares its latest “Social Impact Report, Supporting Sound Communities,” that reveals the company’s “powerful impact story across our 6 pillars of Audacy Serves.” The company says, “This year, we showcase ‘I’m Listening’ as our flagship social impact program dedicated to more mental health conversations. Brands – andLogo - Product media in particular – have an incredible opportunity to impact our lives and communities. Audacy leans into its strength – Audio – to build connection with our listeners. We support their well-being by sharing stories of mental health experiences. This authentic storytelling is the heart of our business and helps improve health outcomes too!  That’s why the content we create for ‘I’m Listening’ features artists, athletes, and celebrities sharing their mental health experiences – we are living our belief, ‘Talk Saves Lives… We’ve raised more than $1.5 million for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention; hosted a national mental health conversation with experts and listeners – all living our belief, Talk Saves Lives.” You can see the complete report here.

Industry Views

Monday Memo: “Try this…”

By Holland Cooke
Consultant

Joe Pags - Radio stationCompanies hire consultants to avoid experiments. We improve results by customizing and implementing Best Practices proven elsewhere. So, I’m about to break a rule, because advertisers in a super-opportune category have become a noisy blur.

Personal Injury: The gift that keeps-on-giving

Legal representation of purported victims of fender benders, slip-and-fall accidents, and other “injuries caused by the negligent, careless, or reckless actions of others” is an industry in which supply exceeds demand. Thus, all the outdoor and TV advertising. And too little radio.

In the Providence, RI TV market I watch at home, this category stands shoulder-to-shoulder with look-alike automotive spots in sheer dollars over-spent. And their message is the same on billboards:

— The attorney’s head shot (also a real estate agent cliché); and

— 6-figure settlements touted.

Because they’re all shouting the same thing, they resort to tactics:

— Attorney Rob Levine is “The Heavy Hitter,” and runs enough TV that viewers in Southern New England can sing the jingle: “The Heavy Hitter is the one for you. Call one-eight-hundred-law-one-two-two-two.” To his credit, it’s a different phone number than his web site offers, so he can track TV results.

— Easier to remember: Bottaro Law: 777-7777.

Watching local Las Vegas TV while at CES recently was a deep dive into Law advertising. The pitch from several I saw was we charge less, like a shameless radio competitor dropping-trou’ to get the entire buy.

If we don’t win, you don’t pay

 “What are your rights? What is your case worth?” Possibly a cash amount divisible-by-3, if that’s the attorney’s contingency.

Those expensive nationally syndicated TV spots (customized for the local firm) depict fearful insurance executives eager to settle. And the attorney may threaten that, “if they don’t, we’ll beat ‘em in court.” Baloney, that’s the last thing the lawyer wants. Too time-consuming and risking a losing verdict.

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Like radio commercials, attorneys’ inventory is perishable

— We can’t sell yesterday’s empty spot avail; and lawyers’ closing opportunity is “B.I.S.,” Butts In Seats for that free, no-obligation consultation, in-person, where the seller goes for the close.

— If nobody was sitting in that chair today (“intake”), no sale.

— And that’s how attorneys are missing a bet not using radio.

“The lawyer is in, the meter is off”

 That’s the proposition when they field listener calls in brokered weekend talk radio shows.

— DONE RIGHT, these shows can run-rings-around TV and outdoor ROI.

— Forgive caps lock in that last sentence, but it’s a crying shame how – at too many stations – the audition for pay-for-play weekend talkers is the-check-didn’t-bounce. One of the things I do for client stations is coach-up weekend warriors — in hosting fundamentals that are second-nature to us — but not to non-career broadcasters. Results = renewals. Otherwise brokered hosts churn, a management distraction, and upsetting listening habits.

— Occasionally, in markets where I don’t even have a client station, I’m working with lawyers (and real estate agents, financial advisors, foodies, and other ask-the-expert hosts), because nobody at the station is doing airchecks with them.

— No billboard or tacky TV spot can humanize the attorney – and demonstrate the comforting counsel – like eavesdropping on a conversation with a caller’s relatable situation.

Think “sales funnel”


We know how to make the phone ring, specific dance steps. The more callers, the better.

— When lines are full, screeners can choose callers whose dilemma is in the attorney’s lane. If, for instance, the host specializes in Personal Injury (or “Family Law,” translation divorce; or another specialty), calls about real estate transactions are off-topic.

— Do this right, and – before the host can offer – callers will often ask “May I call you in the office on Monday?”

Admittedly, this is an experiment…

…because I am frustrated witnessing all this noisy me-too advertising.

Personal Injury cases are he-said-she-said. So try this, and tell me if it works.

— Sales 101: That first call is Needs Assessment, right? Know the prospect’s pain.

— Yet too many radio reps resemble Herb Tarlek, telling the station’s story. Amoeba-shaped coverage maps and ratings rankers and rate cards all look alike…like Law firm marketing.

— I’m telling any attorney willing to listen to make four words the centerpiece of the marketing message, and they’re the same four words that turn callers into clients for weekend talkers: “Tell me what happened.”

The Free Prize Inside: Podcasts

Lifting weekend calls to repurpose as on-demand audio is digital marketing value-added.

Holland Cooke (HollandCooke.com) is a consultant working at the intersection of broadcasting and the Internet. He is the author of “Multiply Your Podcast Subscribers, Without Buying Clicks,” available from Talkers books; and “Spot-On: Commercial Copy Points That Earned The Benjamins,” a FREE download; and the E-book and FREE on-air radio features Inflation Hacks: Save Those Benjamins.” Follow HC on Twitter @HollandCooke

Industry News

Nielsen to Market Edison Research Studies to Ad Agencies

Nielsen says that it will begin marketing Edison Research’s Share of Ear and Edison Podcast Metrics services to advertising agencies. Nielsen says, “Edison’s Share of Ear is a highly regarded and widely cited service that provides deep insights about the complete audio landscape, including broadcast radio, streaming,Logo - Nielsen Holdings podcasting, downloaded audio, smart speakers and other sources of audio content… Edison Podcast Metrics measures persons-based listening estimates using frequently updated surveys to provide a complete view of the rapidly growing podcast audience.” Jon Kaiser is head of Nielsen’s agency and advertiser-direct businesses and he says, “The media landscape is evolving quickly and agencies have a vital need to understand how all the media puzzle pieces fit together. Edison’s insights are best-in-class and Nielsen is excited to work together with them to provide media planners and buyers with deep insights into the total audio landscape and the rapidly growing podcasting audience.”

Industry Views

Radio’s Valuable Asset

TALKERS publisher Michael Harrison says one of the most valuable assets possessed by the radio industry, at this juncture, is the actual word radio itself regardless of which platform carries its content. At this morning’s TALKERS editorial board meeting, Harrison stated, “The rush to abandon the word radio in favor of audio is short-sighted, foolish and a case of throwing the baby out with the bathwater. This trend is indicative of a major blind spot regarding the basics of media theory and the delicate three-way relationship between form, content and institutional branding.”  Harrison continued, “The rush to convert the ‘magical’ business and products of radio to the utilitarian term audio is akin to the motion picture industry theoretically abandoning the words filmmovie or cinema in favor of video… or the journalism industry trading in the word news for information or data… or the automobile industry ditching the word car for vehicle.”  Harrison concludes, “Looking back, maybe the captains of the railroad industry should have stayed in the train business after all and focused on modernizing and improving it as opposed to getting hung up on transportation and winding up with nothing.”

Industry News

Tom Barnard and Hubbard Partner for Streaming Show and Podcast

According to a report from Bring Me The News, former KQRS-FM, Minneapolis morning personality and legendary Twin Cities radio host Tom Barnard is entering into a deal with Hubbard Broadcasting to host aTom Barnard - Museum of Broadcast Communications daily morning program streaming on audio and video from 7:00 am to 10:00 am CT and available as a podcast that the company will produce, distribute and sell. Bring Me The News says, “Barnard will be joined by a co-host, producer, and a number of other guests and contributors. Barnard left KQRS on Dec. 23 after 37 years hosting 92 KQ’s Morning Show, which for a period in the ‘90s was the highest rated morning radio show in the entire country. As he prepared to leave the station, Barnard claimed in an interview with the Star Tribune he had been forced out the door at KQ by parent company Cumulus Media, which had described Barnard’s departure as a ‘retirement.’” Barnard’s new show is expected to debut sometime next month. On Monday of this week, KQRS launched its new morning show hosted by radio personality and former Black Crowes drummer Steve Gorman.